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First Flooding, Now an Unnatural Disaster — the Shutdown — Plagues Rocky Mountain National Park


It's typical for  bull elk to stop traffic in the fall in Rocky Mountain National Park. This isn't a typical fall -- no sightseers due to the shutdown. NWF PhotoIt's typical for bull elk to stop traffic in the fall in Rocky Mountain National Park. This isn't a typical fall -- no sightseers due to the shutdown. NWF PhotoColorado communities are still assessing all the damage from September’s deadly flooding that destroyed or damaged tens of thousands of homes and wiped out roads and highways. People in the town of Estes Park, gateway to Rocky Mountain National Park, were just starting to re-open businesses and gear up for the busy fall tourist season when another disaster struck — this time of the unnatural kind.

The government shutdown that has furloughed nearly 1 million federal employees and disrupted services and programs used by millions of Americans has also closed our national parks, wildlife refuges and other public sites. The National Park Service estimates the park closures are costing $76 million nationwide per day. 

Read more at Wildlife Promise, http://bit.ly/19odvKO

About the Author
Judith Kohler

Judith Kohler is the regional communications manager for the National Wildlife Federation in Boulder, Colo. Before joining NWF in 2011, she covered the environment, energy, politics and general news stories for The Associated Press in Colorado and Wyoming.

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