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Water Under Pressure

For more than a century, efforts to wring oil out of rock formations in the Rocky Mountain West have waxed and waned. The deposits underlying northwestern Colorado, southwestern Wyoming and northeastern Utah have been portrayed as "the Saudi Arabia" of oil shale, a vast source of domestic energy that would cut U.S. dependence on foreign oil, create many jobs and produce millions of dollars of revenue for state and local governments. Read More»

Smart From the Start

Hunters and anglers realize how important energy is, and we support renewable energy development on Western public lands. We want it done thoughtfully, however, to conserve fish and wildlife habitat and water quality. And, given our passion for the land, sportsmen want a voice in shaping renewable energy strategy. Read More»

Hunting and Fishing Imperiled

During the past decade, an unprecedented energy boom has transformed huge tracts of the West’s cherished public lands. Much of this development has happened in irreplaceable wildlife habitat – special places where families have hunted and fished for generations. Unfortunately, because some development is poorly planned, America’s outdoor legacy is at risk. Read More»

Conserving Lands and Prosperity

The Rocky Mountain West, with its vast tracts of public lands, has long been valued for the natural resources that provide fuel, building materials and other commodities and generate jobs and revenue for communities, states and schools. Public lands have also been prized for hunting and fishing opportunities and are increasingly seen as a magnet for tourists, retirees, businesses and professionals in search of a high quality of life. Read More»


All Reports:

Hunting and Fishing Imperiled: Full Report

During the past decade, an unprecedented energy boom has transformed huge tracts of the West’s cherished public lands. Much of this development has happened in irreplaceable wildlife habitat – special places where families have hunted and fished for generations. Unfortunately, because some development is poorly planned, America’s outdoor legacy is at risk. Download Now»

Conserving Lands and Prosperity: Cody, Wyoming Full Report

The U.S. economy needs the raw materials found on western public lands. The jobs supported by developing these commercial resources are important contributors to the western economy. Likewise, jobs and economic benefits dependent on fish, wildlife and the West’s natural qualities have provided steady growth but are often overlooked. Recognizing both activities are economically beneficial, and they can often occur in the same locations, striking a balance between these sometimes conflicting land uses is important to maintain short term and long term economic health in many areas of the rural West. Download Now»

Conserving Lands: Cody Wyoming Fact Sheet

A new report by Sportsmen for Responsible Energy Development explores the economic benefits of public lands adjacent to communities in the Rocky Mountain West. The report written by Southwick Associates found that the region’s rural counties with higher percentages of public lands managed for conservation and recreation reported higher per capita incomes and job growth in sectors ranging from the hospitality industry to health, legal and retail services. Download Now»

Balancing Western Lands Use: Full Case Study

More than half of the land in the Western United states is managed by state and federal governments (Jackson, 1995). Public lands in the seven Rocky Mountain States1 alone cover an area roughly 7.5 times larger than Florida (see Figure 1). These public lands shape rural economies and cultures by providing raw materials, recreational opportunities, wildlife habitat, natural beauty and ecosystem services. The wide range of benefits provided by public lands are partially the result of diverse and sometimes conflicting management goals, which range from encouraging extraction, to promoting tourism, to preserving wilderness. Download Now»

Wyoming Fact Sheets

Over the past decade, the federal government has leased nearly 30 million acres of our public lands for oil and gas drilling, resulting in an unprecedented loss of fish and wildlife habitat in the Rocky Mountain West. With expedited energy projects threatening the public lands of Wyoming and other Western states, some of the most important areas for hunting and fishing could be dramatically affected by development unless we promote solutions that balance extraction with wildlife conservation. Download Now»

Utah Fact Sheets

From the Book Cliffs to Strawberry Reservoir, Utah’s healthy big-game herds and quality fisheries are a direct result of the foresight and determination of American sportsmen. A century ago, hunters and anglers laid the foundation of conservation in this country, and our leadership is needed once again to ensure the future of our hunting and fishing heritage. Utah sportsmen must show support for balanced management of our public lands. Download Now»

New Mexico Fact Sheets

Currently, the BLM does not require the energy industry to implement common-sense measures that allow development of oil and gas reserves while accommodating viable populations of fish and wildlife on our public lands. At the request of industry, BLM is leasing approximately 100,000 acres every three months in New Mexico alone. Download Now»

Montana Fact Sheets

Irresponsible oil and gas development on federal public lands damages vital fish and wildlife habitat, threatening Montana’s great hunting and fishing heritage. Current national energy policy threatens the future of Montana’s sporting traditions. Download Now»

Colorado Fact Sheets

Over the past decade, the Rocky Mountains have experienced a dramatic loss of fish and wildlife habitat due to irresponsible oil and gas drilling. The iconic landscapes and game species that have made this region a paradise for American sportsmen are being lost for short-term gains. More than 30 million acres of federal public lands have already been leased for oil and gas development in the Rocky Mountains. The current rush to drill on our public lands is changing our favorite places to hunt and fish into industrial zones, limiting hunting access and sacrificing crucial habitat for industry Download Now»

SFRED Press Summary January to July 2008

Clippings from various news sources. Download Now»

Recommendations for Responsible Oil and Gas Development

This report outlines sportsmen’s recommendations for responsible energy development in the Rocky Mountain West—a platform and prescription for development that accommodates our energy needs without sacrificing our Western heritage. Fish, wildlife and water defi ne the West, and these resources belong to all Americans. The production of fossil fuels, while important, must not occur at the expense of the productive capacity of the lands, waters, and fi sh and wildlife that sustain us. Download Now»

Sportsmen's Bill of Rights

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